Page 4 of our reviews

Killing Commendatore by Haruki Murakami

Reviewed by Bernard Caleo

Smoothly, calmly, Haruki Murakami leads us out to the latest outpost of his fictional universe. We survey the hillside and the lonely house in which the narrator has come to live. Once, it belonged t…

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The Children’s House by Alice Nelson

Reviewed by Caitlin Cassidy

The Children’s House begins in the sweltering heat of summer in New York’s eclectic Harlem. The year is 1997, three years after the Rwandan genocide. Marina Hirsch, a young professor teaching at Colu…

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Women Talking by Miriam Toews

Reviewed by Tristen Kiri Brudy

Between 2005 and 2009, in a remote Mennonite colony in Bolivia, hundreds of girls and women would wake every morning feeling bruised, abused, and battered. This was attributed for many years to ghost…

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Boys Will Be Boys by Clementine Ford

Reviewed by Elke Power

Just as she did with the title of her first book, Clementine Ford has taken another well-known expression and repurposed it for the title of her second. Ford reclaimed Fight Like A Girl and framed th…

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My Two Blankets (bilingual editions) by Irena Kobald & Freya Blackwood

Reviewed by Gabrielle Williams

My Two Blankets is a beautiful book that tells the story of the strangeness of a new world for a little girl who has moved to Australia with her auntie. The words people are speaking sound strange an…

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The World Was Whole by Fiona Wright

Reviewed by Bronte Coates

This is the second non-fiction book from acclaimed Australian writer Fiona Wright. In 13 essays, she delves into the spaces we inhabit – our bodies and our homes – and explores what it means when the…

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Foe by Iain Reid

Reviewed by Amanda Rayner

Living in isolation amid farming land predominantly owned by big industry and the government, Hen and Junior receive a late-night visitor. Terrance is an employee of Outermore; an organisation origin…

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Melmoth by Sarah Perry

Reviewed by Cindy Morris

Melmoth is watching every dark and wicked act. You can feel her eyes on you wherever you are. Her eternal loneliness draws her to those who believe they can’t be redeemed. She is both feared and long…

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All the Ways to be Smart by Davina Bell & Allison Colpoys

Reviewed by Bronte Coates

A radiant celebration of the many different talents children can have, All the Ways to be Smart is certain to be one of the picture books of the year. The third release from Australian duo Davina Bel…

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Now We Shall Be Entirely Free by Andrew Miller

Reviewed by Elke Power

English author Andrew Miller has been winning awards for his writing ever since his first book, Ingenious Pain, was published in 1997 and won the James Tait Black Memorial Prize, the International IM…

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