Page 3 of our reviews

The List by Patricia Forde

Reviewed by Angela Crocombe

This dystopian middle fiction title is set in a world in the aftermath of great tragedy caused by global warming and human greed. Food and water are heavily rationed, people are not allowed to speak …

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Oliver Loving by Stefan Merrill Block

Reviewed by Tristen Kiri Brudy

There are many ways to describe the titular Oliver Loving – his mother’s favourite son, a beloved older brother to Charlie, and an aspiring poet. He has also been comatose (perhaps even brain-dead) f…

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The Odyssey by Homer (translated by Emily Wilson)

Reviewed by Marie Matteson

Having listened to Mary Beard talk about Women & Power, starting with an incident in Homer’s The Odyssey, (‘I want to start very near the beginning of the tradition of Western literature, and its fir…

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The Water Will Come by Jeff Goodell

Reviewed by Kara Nicholson

After witnessing the devastation from Hurricane Sandy which wreaked havoc on the East Coast of the United States, Cuba and parts of the Caribbean in 2012, Rolling Stone journalist Jeff Goodell headed…

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Feel Free by Zadie Smith

Reviewed by Jo Case

Zadie Smith’s new collection brings together eight years of eclectic cultural essays written ‘during the eight years of the Obama presidency’.

In her foreword, she is specific about this period, and…

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Scythe by Neal Shusterman

Reviewed by Alistair Mathieson Lynn

In Neal Shusterman’s latest dark, dystopian epic, Scythe, the age of mortality is over. All inhabitants of earth are now immune from disease, old age and even suicide in their stable, AI-governed uto…

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The Hazel Wood by Melissa Albert

Reviewed by Pilgrim Hodgson

Stay away from the Hazel Wood was the warning Alice’s mother Ella left before she vanished.

Bad luck isn’t new to Alice and Ella though, and they’ve spent years on the move doing their best to stay…

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Winter by Ali Smith

Reviewed by Marie Matteson

For around 20 years, Ali Smith has had a quartet of novels, named simply after the seasons, in the back of her head. Winter is the second of these novels. The first, Autumn, was shortlisted for this …

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Stories and True Stories by Helen Garner

Reviewed by Jo Case

I know I’m not the only Melbourne writer whose motto, at my laptop, is WWHGD (what would Helen Garner do?). From Monkey Grip – Readings’ first Australian bestseller – to last year’s collected non-fic…

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Gnomon by Nick Harkaway

Reviewed by Chris Dite

In the near future Britain has become a place of complete and utter transparency. Every utterance is recorded. Parliament has been disbanded. But this is no hackneyed North Korea. Everyone sees, hear…

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