Our latest reviews

First Person by Richard Flanagan

Reviewed by Mark Rubbo

Probably Australia’s largest fraud case involved John Friedrich, executive director of the National Safety Council of Australia. Friedrich embezzled almost $300 million from a number of banks through…

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Soon by Lois Murphy

Reviewed by Michael McLoughlin

A fleet of forebodingly official-looking vehicles arrives one winter solstice in the West Australian town of Nebulah. The vehicles disappear as mysteriously as they appeared, and with them go the bir…

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The Trauma Cleaner by Sarah Krasnostein

Reviewed by Kara Nicholson

Writer and lawyer Sarah Krasnostein first met Sandra Pankhurst at a conference for forensic support services. Sandra’s business card advertises ‘specialised trauma cleaning’: ‘hoarding and pet hoardi…

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Home Fire by Kamila Shamsie

Reviewed by Ellen Cregan

Imagine living in a world where every act you undertake is politicised, against your will. For some readers, this will be a reality. Kamila Shamsie’s latest novel, Home Fire, depicts this very phenom…

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Il Diavolo by Accademia Arcadia

Reviewed by Kate Rockstrom

Many people know the story of the Devil’s Trill Sonata by Tartini. How he dreamed one night he made a pact with the devil, who took up Tartini’s violin and played ‘a sonata so wonderful and so beauti…

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Prime Suspect 1973

Reviewed by Suzanne Steinbruckner

It’s very satisfying to go back in time and watch the origin story of a character you’ve come to know well from a long-running series. In Prime Suspect 1973, that’s exactly what happens, as newcomer …

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Thornhill by Pam Smy

Reviewed by Dani Solomon

Thornhill is a beautiful book, from its striking greyscale silhouetted cover to the pages in-between. The book contains two stories set in two different times. Mary’s story is set in 1982, in a child…

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The Sparsholt Affair by Alan Hollinghurst

Reviewed by Kelsey Oldham

Spanning 70 years, Alan Hollinghurst’s long-awaited new novel begins with a group of friends at Oxford during World War II and follows the ensemble over the years and generations. The book is divided…

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Lotta Sea Lice by Courtney Barnett and Kurt Vile

Reviewed by Pia Spreadborough

‘I cherish my intercontinental friendships…’ Australian indie-rock sensation Courtney Barnett croons on ‘Continental Breakfast’ – moments later American spacey-rock sensation Kurt Vile adds, ‘Somewhe…

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Friend of My Youth by Amit Chaudhuri

Reviewed by Anaya Latter

This loving, gentle book evokes the chaotic colours and sounds of Bombay through the eyes of an expatriate writer, returning to his childhood home. Weaving through time at an eddying pace, Amit Chaud…

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