Gabrielle Williams

Gabrielle Williams is a bookseller at Readings Malvern. She is also an acclaimed author of young adult fiction. Her books include Beatle Meets Destiny, The Reluctant Hallelujah, The Guy, the Girl, the Artist and His Ex and My Life as a Hashtag.

Reviews

The Red-Haired Woman by Orhan Pamuk

Reviewed by Gabrielle Williams

When a book starts with a quote from Nietzsche about Oedipus, you know you can expect fathers, sons, mothers and lovers to become entangled with devastating consequences. When th eauthor is a previou…

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In The Darkroom by Susan Faludi

Reviewed by Gabrielle Williams

If this book was written as fiction, you’d never believe it because you’d think it was too far-fetched. In 2004, Susan Faludi received an email from her father (whom she hadn’t seen in twenty-five ye…

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The Noise of Time by Julian Barnes

Reviewed by Gabrielle Williams

What a delight it has been to spend time with Julian Barnes and his new novel, The Noise of Time. Elegantly written and perfectly balanced, this slight book (it comes in at under 200 pages) is Barnes…

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Where My Heart Used To Beat by Sebastian Faulks

Reviewed by Gabrielle Williams

Like Alice down the rabbit hole (if Alice was a 60-year-old man, and the rabbit hole was somehow New York and London and a remote island off the coast of France), the new Sebastian Faulks novel gets …

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The Blue Guitar by John Banville

Reviewed by Gabrielle Williams

Right from page one of John Banville’s new novel, you know you’re in for a ride with a tricky, slippery character. Oliver Orme describes himself as a thief and a painter, and then writes, ‘Ha! What I…

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Happy are the Happy by Yasmina Reza

Reviewed by Gabrielle Williams

Happy are the Happy examines the lives of 18 Parisians as they struggle to cope with coupledom and marriage generally. And happy, it ain’t. There are 21 short stories in all, with characters who have…

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The Walk Home by Rachel Seiffert

Reviewed by Gabrielle Williams

I’ve never considered the flute to be a particularly controversial instrument, but apparently it can be. Reading The Walk Home I was thrown, unexpectedly, into a world where joining a marching band c…

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Thank You for Your Service by David Finkel

Reviewed by Gabrielle Williams

David Finkel can write – and how. Thank You For Your Service is his second non-fiction book delving into the lives of soldiers who were on the front line in Baghdad (his first book was the incredible…

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Floodline by Kathryn Heyman

Reviewed by Gabrielle Williams

After reading the blurb for Floodline, I was worried I was in for something a little more lightweight than you’d expect from Kathryn Heyman: ‘The feisty, sexy and dynamic host of a Christian shopping…

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His Stupid Boyhood by Peter Goldsworthy

Reviewed by Gabrielle Williams

Peter Goldsworthy has laid himself open for inspection – like one of his cadavers from medical school – in this memoir.

Starting with his first sexual inclination, at age four, towards crank-handled…

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Boy, Lost by Kristina Olsson

Reviewed by Gabrielle Williams

Bringing her journalistic skills to what is described on the cover as a ‘family memoir’, Kristina Olsson uses perfectly balanced prose to weave breathtaking beauty into this sad yarn.

As a 19-year-o…

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News

The Readings Prize for New Australian Fiction shortlist 2017

by Gabrielle Williams

The Readings Prize for New Australian Fiction considers first and second books from Australian authors, with the aim of recognising exciting and exceptional new contributions to local literature.

Over the past year, the judges have read their way through over 70 Australian titles and were impressed by the number of edgy voices who didn’t shy away from starkly original concepts. The task of filte…

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Tackling social media in teen books

by Gabrielle Williams

Gabrielle Williams is an an acclaimed author of young adult fiction. Her new novel, My Life as a Hashtag, is a funny, heartfelt read about rage, regret and the pitfalls of life in the digital age. We recently asked Williams how she approached social media when writing for teenagers. Here is her response.

When I was at school, my friend’s boyfriend broke up with her via toilet paper. I imagine…

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