Non-Fiction reviews

Australia Day by Stan Grant

Stan Grant has an issue with how we are responding to Australia Day. In his new book Australia Day, he argues that not all Australians are racist. Grant believes that the present media coverage of th…

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Women’s Work by Megan K. Stack

Megan K. Stack has been a finalist for the National Book Award and the Pulitzer Prize in international reporting. She was a war correspondent for the Los Angeles Times; she made a career of immersing…

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Growing Up African in Australia edited by Maxine Beneba Clarke, Ahmed Yussuf & Magan Magan

In her introduction to Growing Up African in Australia, Maxine Beneba Clarke sets the scene for an anthology of great specificity. As she explains, this is an anthology that ‘would be an African dias…

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City of Trees by Sophie Cunningham

Sophie Cunningham has written a collection of travel writing that grapples with the destructive nature of tourism. Or is it nature writing that never forgets its place within the machine that threate…

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Witches: What Women Do Together by Sam George-Allen

Witches can be many things, but one thing is for sure: they are women of fearsome power. They are also women who have a tradition of helping other women. Witches are women on the margins, and in our …

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From Secret Ballot to Democracy Sausage by Judith Brett

Judith Brett’s latest offering, hot on the heels of her bestselling (and award-winning) biography of Alfred Deakin, is a tightly written history of Australia’s electoral system. Moreover, it reads li…

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Unlike the Heart: A Memoir of Brain and Mind by Nicola Redhouse

In this extraordinary memoir, the reader is taken into the confidence of Nicola Redhouse: writer, editor, reader and, above all, someone who constantly seeks to better understand the human condition …

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Accidental Feminists by Jane Caro

Accidental Feminists is a celebration of the women who came after the Australian women who won the right to vote. These secondwave feminists grew up earning money most of their lives, a fact that is …

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Beyond Words: A Year with Kenneth Cook by Jacqueline Kent

In 1985, Jacqueline Kent was living in Sydney and working as a freelance book editor. At a dinner party, she met Kenneth Cook, author of classic Australian novel Wake in Fright. The two quickly fell …

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The Arsonist by Chloe Hooper

In February 2009, the state of Victoria experienced extreme weather events that provided the perfect conditions for the bushfire catastrophe that has come to be known as Black Saturday. One hundred a…

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