Non-Fiction reviews

Women in the Picture: What Culture Does with Women’s Bodies by Catherine McCormack

Reading Catherine McCormack’s new book is an antidote to something I didn’t know had been happening to me. I have read writers that McCormack references such as Griselda Pollock, Hélène Cixous and Ba…

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Things Are Against Us by Lucy Ellmann

Lucy Ellmann’s most recent novel, Ducks, Newburyport, was nominated for the Booker Prize in 2019. It is over 1000 pages long, has no paragraph breaks and almost no full stops. It is also a compelling…

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Soil: The Incredible Story of What Keeps the Earth, and Us, Healthy by Matthew Evans

Read a book on soil, they said. You like gardening, eating, breathing – read a book on soil. Until now, I can honestly say that soil has not been a passion of mine, but now I am all about considering…

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Trivial Grievances: On the Contradictions, Myths and Misery of Your 30s by Bridie Jabour

In late 2019, Guardian Australia opinion editor Bridie Jabour wrote a viral article titled ‘The millennials at 31: Welcome to the age of misery’. Jabour wrote it believing the unique social and econo…

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Where We Swim by Ingrid Horrocks

At a time when we can’t travel very far from home, let Ingrid Horrocks take you to bodies of water across the world in Where We Swim, a warm and compelling blend of memoir, travel and nature writing.…

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Who Gets To Be Smart by Bri Lee

Bri Lee’s first book, Eggshell Skull, interrogated the failure of the Australian legal system to protect and advocate for victims of sexual assault. Lee’s ability to blend her own deeply personal sto…

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Beeswing: Fairport, Folk Rock and Finding My Voice, 1967–75 by Richard Thompson

In Beeswing, songwriter and guitarist Richard Thompson gives his account of the amazing period of cultural change in 1960s London and beyond. This period in music has been written about extensively, …

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Fury by Kathryn Heyman

At a time when it often feels impossible to take a breather from the overwhelming injustices and inequalities that warrant outrage, you might hesitate to pick up a book called Fury. This memoir by pr…

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With the Falling of the Dusk by Stan Grant

Stan Grant’s new book is not a long book. It will only take you an evening to read, but my advice is to take your time with it. In With the Falling of the Dusk, Grant has created his snapshot of the …

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No Document by Anwen Crawford

I place my review copy of Anwen Crawford’s No Document on the ledge under the mirror at my hairdresser appointment. The book is full of coloured tags and my hairdresser, who has just told me she was …

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