Non-Fiction reviews

The Luminous Solution: Creativity, Resilience and the Inner Life by Charlotte Wood

In the preface of The Luminous Solution, Charlotte Wood muses upon the bookshelf positioned directly behind her writing chair. Wood is unsentimental about keeping the vast majority of books she reads…

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Signs and Wonders: Dispatches from a Time of Beauty and Loss by Delia Falconer

Every now and then, I am completely delighted when a book comes along that seems to be an extension – an elegant and well- crafted extension – of my own thoughts. Delia Falconer’s Signs and Wonders h…

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Fulfillment by Alec MacGillis

On the face of it, Amazon has made consumption very easy for a lot of people in America and elsewhere in the world: order goods online at discounted prices, and the items will arrive at your door bef…

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Lies, Damned Lies by Claire G. Coleman

Noongar writer Claire G. Coleman blazed onto the local literary scene like a comet with her debut novel Terra Nullius in 2017. With its ingenious blend of historical and speculative fiction, it chall…

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My Body Keeps Your Secrets by Lucia Osborne-Crowley

If you have already read Lucia Osborne-Crowley’s I Choose Elena then you will understand her latest brilliant work, My Body Keeps Your Secrets, comes with a warning from me. This book is about sexual…

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The Right to Sex by Amia Srinivasan

Oxford University academic Amia Srinivasan may be known to some readers for the title essay of this collection, which appeared in the London Review of Books in 2018. The piece uses the grim phenomeno…

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Why You Should Give a F*ck About Farming by Gabrielle Chan

‘I would rather pay for the farmer who passes up a few points of economic productivity to keep the fallen tree in the paddock for nesting birds. I would rather pay a farming family who is involved in…

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The Women of Little Lon by Barbara Minchinton

If I asked if you knew about Madame Brussels, I’d forgive you for responding: ‘oh, the rooftop bar at the Spring Street end of Bourke Street, where the staff used to get around in tennis whites?’. Us…

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Fox and I by Catherine Raven

Catherine Raven lives on her own in a tiny hand-built house, on acres of land off a dirt track that has never been named, far from towns and civilisation. She likes it that way – the remoteness of he…

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The First Time I Thought I Was Dying by Sarah Walker

In the opening chapter of her extraordinary essay collection, Sarah Walker introduces the notion that ‘the out-of-control body can be a radical site’. This statement is the powerful heart of The Firs

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