Non-Fiction reviews

Small Wrongs by Kate Rossmanith

Reviewed by Elke Power

Small Wrongs is a powerful consideration of remorse, and whether we can ever truly know it when we see it. As an ethnologist, Kate Rossmanith is more than equipped to explore this subject from a theo…

Read more ›

Waiting for Elijah by Kate Wild

Reviewed by Amanda Rayner

Just before 2pm on 2 June 2009, in the NSW country town of Armidale, Senior Constable Andrew Rich fatally shot 24-year-old Elijah Holcombe. Elijah had been experiencing increasing periods of paranoid…

Read more ›

The Year Everything Changed: 2001 by Phillipa McGuinness

Reviewed by Chris Gordon

Phillipa McGuinness is no stranger to books; she is, after all, a publisher. This, however, is her debut as an author and hopefully it will not be her last. The Year Everything Changed: 2001 is a rec…

Read more ›

Origin Story by David Christian

Reviewed by Mark Rubbo

David Christian coined the phrase ‘Big History’ in reference to a project that aims to tell the story of everything that’s happened from the beginning of the universe until now. It’s an idea that cau…

Read more ›

Balancing Acts edited by Justin Wolfers & Erin Riley

Reviewed by Marie Matteson

A collection of 21 essays on women and sport, Balancing Acts runs the gamut from historically focused essay on the reception of women playing AFL, to a text-message story of a an amateur soccer team,…

Read more ›

Marcia Langton: Welcome to Country by Marcia Langton

Reviewed by Mark Rubbo

I sense a growing desire for non-Indigenous Australians to know about our Indigenous culture. The recent successes of Growing Up Aboriginal in Australia (one of our bestsellers last month) and Alexis…

Read more ›

Axiomatic by Maria Tumarkin

Reviewed by Kara Nicholson

Brow Books is a local, not-for-profit, literary organisation that promises to publish ‘writers whose work sits in the literary margins’. Axiomatic uniquely combines narrative, reportage and essay and…

Read more ›

A History of the World in Seven Cheap Things by Raj Patel & Jason W. Moore

Reviewed by Kara Nicholson

Don’t be fooled by the simplistic title of this book as there are profound insights into the economic, social and environmental processes of the planet to be found on almost every page. The authors h…

Read more ›

The Italian Garden edited by Cecilia Hewlett & Narelle McAuliffe

Reviewed by Margaret Snowdon

The Italian Garden is a collaborative work centred on the restoration of a traditional Italian garden at the Monash Centre at Palazzo Vaj in the heart of medieval Prato in Tuscany. Over the centuries…

Read more ›

Enlightenment Now by Steven Pinker

Reviewed by Mark Rubbo

In 1784, philosopher Immanuel Kant asked, ‘What is Enlightenment?’ It was, he argued, humankind’s emergence from its submission to the ‘dogmas and formulas’ of religious or political authority. The E…

Read more ›