Non-Fiction reviews

Sand Talk by Tyson Yunkaporta

Reviewed by Elke Power

Tyson Yunkaporta’s Sand Talk is an extraordinary reading experience. It’s both philosophical and practical, and underpinned by a compassionate yet realistic humanity. At the core of Sand Talk is a de…

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The Anarchy by William Dalrymple

Reviewed by Julia Jackson

Given the dastardly activities of some of our massive corporations of today, the antics contained within William Dalrymple’s latest offering shouldn’t really come as a huge shock to readers. I say th…

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Say Nothing by Patrick Radden Keefe

Reviewed by Mark Rubbo

Say Nothing, Patrick Radden Keefe’s examination of the Troubles in Northern Ireland from the late 1960s to the Good Friday Agreement in 1998, won the 2019 Orwell Prize for Political Writing. Keefe, a…

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White Tears/Brown Scars by Ruby Hamad

Reviewed by Kara Nicholson

In 2018, journalist Ruby Hamad wrote an article for The Guardian Australia titled ‘How white women use strategic tears to silence women of colour’. It received worldwide praise and condemnation. An A…

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Harry Seidler’s Umbrella by Joe Rollo

Reviewed by Mark Rubbo

The first thing that strikes you about this book is its sheer beauty. Joe Rollo got his friend and graphic designer Garry Emery to design the book and together they agonised over it. It’s a lovely ob…

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Salt: Selected Stories and Essays by Bruce Pascoe

Reviewed by Marie Matteson

From the author of the game-changing Dark Emu comes Salt, a selection of essays and stories spanning more than thirty years. A paradigm shift does not happen overnight, and Salt provides a wonderful …

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Women, Men and the Whole Damn Thing by David Leser

Reviewed by Alison Huber

Journalist David Leser has written a timely and passionate contribution to the public discourse that is emerging in the wake of the #MeToo movement. It’s the contribution of, in his own words, ‘a str…

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Unrequited Love by Dennis Altman

Reviewed by Andrea Goldsmith

Dennis Altman is a close friend of mine, but I needed to read Unrequited Love to discover the richness of his life. His work in gay politics has taken him across the globe – and still does. (The unre…

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The Wooleen Way by David Pollock

Reviewed by Michael McLoughlin

’Pastoralism might be a dirty word in Australia. I think there is a certain correlation in Australian’s minds between pastoralism, colonisation, the displacement of Aboriginal people, and soil degrad

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See What You Made Me Do by Jess Hill

Reviewed by Elke Power

Sometimes you begin reading a book and everything else you need to do or think about instantly recedes. See What You Made Me Do by Jess Hill is one such book. Hill is a Walkley Award-winning investig…

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