Non-Fiction reviews

Root and Branch by Eda Gunaydin

Root & Branch is the debut essay collection from Eda Gunaydin, a Turkish-Australian writer and academic. Gunaydin’s essays cover a wide range of topics: class, wealth, post-colonisation, whiteness, h…

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The Premonitions Bureau by Sam Knight

In 2019 writer and journalist Sam Knight wrote an article that appeared in The New Yorker. It was titled ‘The psychiatrist who believed people could tell the future’. Knight found the subject of that…

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Bedtime Story by Chloe Hooper

How does one react when one’s partner is diagnosed with cancer? In her new memoir Bedtime Story, Chloe Hooper is forced to grapple with that question when her partner, Don, is diagnosed with a parti…

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The Matter of Everything by Suzie Sheehy

Despite being inpossession of so little scientific knowledge that the mysteries of the internal combustion engine still elude me, I found myself absorbed by this fascinating book. Suzie Sheehy is a p…

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True Friends by Patti Miller

‘I’ve been wondering why, compared to romantic love, the love of friends is not much written about.’ Seeking to redress this balance, albeit on a minor scale, Patti Miller sets out to recall and reco…

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The Most Important Job in the World by Gina Rushton

‘Should I have children?’ This deceptively simple and universally common question is what inspired journalist Gina Rushton to investigate the complex ecosystem of ‘motherhood’ in our uncertain presen…

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On Helen Garner: Writers on Writers by Sean O’Beirne

Sean O’Beirne first read Helen Garner when he was 17 years old. Reading Monkey Grip, what struck him immediately was the voice, the confident voice stating, ‘this is me, this is what and who I am, an…

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Childless: A Story of Freedom and Longing by Sian Prior

The question of whether or not to have children was never one that held any ambivalence for Sian Prior: she always wanted to have children of her own. She had many concerns about the future of the pl…

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The Bookseller at the End of the World by Ruth Shaw

I knew nothing about Ruth Shaw or her Two Wee Bookshops in beautiful tiny Manapouri on New Zealand’s South Island. An author photo in her memoir shows a smiling older woman and I assumed I was going …

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Skin Deep: The Inside Story of Our Outer Selves by Phillipa McGuinness

How often do you think about your skin? Its biology, its cultural signifiers, its protective qualities and weaknesses? It’s the largest organ in our body (although this book taught me this is up for …

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