International Fiction reviews

Heather, The Totality by Matthew Weiner

Reviewed by Jo Case

I was excited to read the first novel from Matthew Mad Men Weiner – not just because he’s the meticulous craftsman at the helm of one of my favourite screen stories, but because he’s often cited 1950…

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Future Home of the Living God by Louise Erdrich

Reviewed by Jo Case

Following Trump’s election, classic dystopias like 1984 and The Handmaid’s Tale have resurfaced on bestseller lists. In our mid-climate-change, post-truth, resource-depleted, racist-and-sexist-backla…

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Origin by Dan Brown

Reviewed by Kirrily Ireland

I’ve just finished reading the final chapters of Origin and feel deeply satiated. It’s been four years since Inferno, four years since I last experienced the unique sense of suspense, intrigue and do…

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Gnomon by Nick Harkaway

Reviewed by Chris Dite

In the near future Britain has become a place of complete and utter transparency. Every utterance is recorded. Parliament has been disbanded. But this is no hackneyed North Korea. Everyone sees, hear…

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Winter by Ali Smith

Reviewed by Marie Matteson

For around 20 years, Ali Smith has had a quartet of novels, named simply after the seasons, in the back of her head. Winter is the second of these novels. The first, Autumn, was shortlisted for this …

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The Travelling Cat Chronicles by Hiro Arikawa

Reviewed by Amanda Rayner

A bestseller in Japan and now internationally, The Travelling Cat Chronicles (translated by Murakami translator Philip Gabriel) takes us on the road with Nana and his owner Satoru. Taken in by Satoru…

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The World of Tomorrow by Brendan Matthews

Reviewed by Chris Gordon

Brendan Mathews chose 1939 as his setting because this year in history is echoed in the present. America was in an economic slump, there was a refugee crisis and fascism was a rising trend, worldwide…

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The Growing Season by Helen Sedgwick

Reviewed by Amanda Rayner

In The Growing Season, the world is much like it is now, with one major difference. For three generations the FullLife baby pouch has enabled anyone, regardless of age or gender, to affordably and sa…

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The Most Dangerous Place on Earth by Lindsey Lee Johnson

Reviewed by Stella Charls

With her electric debut novel, Lindsey Lee Johnson has skilfully teased out the everyday dramas that exist in ‘The Most Dangerous Place on Earth’: high school. Set in one of the world’s wealthiest co…

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Home Fire by Kamila Shamsie

Reviewed by Ellen Cregan

Imagine living in a world where every act you undertake is politicised, against your will. For some readers, this will be a reality. Kamila Shamsie’s latest novel, Home Fire, depicts this very phenom…

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