Page 496 of our reviews

The Hakawati: Rabih Alameddine

I loved this book and could not put it down, which made for a very tricky week as I have a six-month-old who also didn’t want to be put down. It’s amazing how much reading you can get done jiggling o…

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Lamarck’s Evolution: Ross Honeywill

Australian scientist Ted Steele chanced on nineteenth-century French scientist, Jean-Baptiste Lamarck, on a long plane flight in 1978. Reading Arthur Koestler’s Janus, he was particularly struck by t…

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America America: Ethan Canin

Ethan Canin has published several short story collections and some promising novels including the very fine Carry Me Across the Water, but he has moved up several notches with America America.

The …

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That’d Be Right: William McInnes

William McInnes’s writing is a lot like my favourite of his characters: the grizzled journalist, Max Connors, from Sea Change. It’s laconic, unapologetically blokey; a dry wit spiked with lightly wor…

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Twilight: Azhar Abidi

I loved Azhar Abidi’s first novel, Passarola Rising, a historical fable set in eighteenth-century Portugal about a fantastical air voyage by a pair of Brazilian brothers. His latest novel, while just…

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Bone By Bone: Tony Johnston

David is nine and growing up fast in 1950s Tennessee. He knows all the bones of the human body and one day, he’s going to be a doctor like his father. Malcolm is David’s best friend. He also knows th…

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A Death In Tuscany: Michele Giuttari

In a town in present-day Tuscany, the body of an unidentifiable girl, possibly no more than thirteen, is discovered. She appears to have died of a heroin overdose, though with no one reporting her mi…

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The Good Thief: Hannah Tinti

At the start of Hannah Tinti’s debut novel, twelve-year-old, one-handed Ren has been stuck in an orphanage for as long as he can remember. He doesn’t know how he lost his hand or what happened to his…

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Dissection: Jacinta Halloran

Melbourne GP Dr Anna McBride is suffering under the weight of a three-year-old malpractice suit. Her carefully constructed life is disintegrating, both personally and professionally. The tone of the …

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How The Soldier Repairs The Gramophone: Sasa Stanisic

Born in Višegrad, Bosnia and escaping during its Serbian invasion, Saša Stanišić charts his debut novel as a whimsical child tenderly mindful of the river Drina.

Witness to war and peace, the Drina…

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