Page 487 of our reviews

The Life You Can Save: Peter Singer

Peter Singer knows how to confront you, to make you feel uncomfortable. If a person was walking down a road past a pond and saw a small child in trouble, most of them would jump in without a thought.…

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Butterfly: Sonya Hartnett

Sonya Hartnett’s latest novel (like Of a Boy, which won the 2003 Age Book of the Year Award) will appeal to readers well beyond the age of its nearly 14-year-old protagonist.

Plum Coyle exists in a …

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The Best Australian Short Stories 2008: Delia Falconer (Ed)

Delia Falconer writes in her introduction to this collection, ‘most stories in Australia are written for pleasure, for the sheer joy of cutting loose.’ This is apparent in the twenty-six stories Fal…

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New Australian Stories: Aviva Tuffield (Ed)

Short stories seem to be enjoying a resurgence of late. New annuals devoted to them (like Black Inc.’s Best Australian Stories and the Sleepers Almanacs) seem to be thriving; while writers like Cate…

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Revolutionary Road: Richard Yates

American novelist and short-story writer Richard Yates passed away in 1992 (aged 66) all but forgotten, with most of his works languishing out-of-print. He has retained a small but utterly devoted fo…

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The Best Australian Essays 2008: David Marr (Ed)

The Best Australian Essays has a new editor this year: the always-interesting David Marr. I was excited to see his pick of the year’s best, and wasn’t disappointed.

Christos Tsiolkas opens the coll…

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Breakneck: Erica Spindler

In Rockford, Illinois, a 21-year-old computer science student and hacker is murdered in cold blood. Detective Mary Catherine Riggio is determined to solve the case, but soon finds herself facing her …

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Say When: Catherine Deveny

I read Catherine Deveny’s previous book, It’s Not My Fault They Print Them on a 12-hour train journey from Melbourne to Adelaide. The other passengers glanced worriedly at the crazy lady (me) guffawi…

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The Best Australian Humorous Writing: Andrew O'Keefe and Steve Vizard (Eds)

I approached this title with some trepidation. For what, exactly, is humourous writing? One man’s comedy is another man’s dross, the laughter quotient often governed more by the reader than the write…

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The Girl Who Played With Fire: Stieg Larsson

I’m not a huge reader of crime fiction – I think of it more as a guilty pleasure from time to time if I chance on something that really rocks my boat! But I’m as excited as if it were a new Cormac Mc…

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