Page 469 of our reviews

The Hakawati: Rabih Alameddine

Reviewed by Sanchia Hovey, Readings St Kilda

I loved this book and could not put it down, which made for a very tricky week as I have a six-month-old who also didn’t want to be put down. It’s amazing how much reading you can get done jiggling o…

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The Atlas Of Impossible Longing: Anuradha Roy

Reviewed by Kabita Dhara, Readings Carlton

Anuradha Roy is best known in book circles as a publisher at Permanent Black, a small Indian publishing imprint that was set up by Roy and her husband after their controversial departures from Oxford…

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America America: Ethan Canin

Reviewed by Russ Radcliffe, High Horse Books Publishing

Ethan Canin has published several short story collections and some promising novels including the very fine Carry Me Across the Water, but he has moved up several notches with America America.

The …

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A Guide To The Birds Of East Africa: Nicholas Drayson

Reviewed by Dimitri Gonis, freelance reviewer

Rose Mbikwa is a widow – a victim of Kenyan politics and an ardent birdwatcher. She doesn’t know it, but she is also the trophy of a wager between two old classmates. Mr Malik, also widowed, is passi…

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Twilight: Azhar Abidi

Reviewed by Kabita Dhara, Readings Carlton

I loved Azhar Abidi’s first novel, Passarola Rising, a historical fable set in eighteenth-century Portugal about a fantastical air voyage by a pair of Brazilian brothers. His latest novel, while just…

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The Good Thief: Hannah Tinti

Reviewed by Louise Swinn, Editorial Director of Sleepers Publishing

At the start of Hannah Tinti’s debut novel, twelve-year-old, one-handed Ren has been stuck in an orphanage for as long as he can remember. He doesn’t know how he lost his hand or what happened to his…

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The Collector Of Worlds: Ilya Troyanov

Reviewed by Maloti Ray, freelance reviewer

Sir Richard Francis Burton – explorer, writer, soldier, diplomat – is acclaimed for his vivid translation of two masterpieces; from Arabic, One Thousand Nights and A Night and from Sanskrit, The Kama

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How The Soldier Repairs The Gramophone: Sasa Stanisic

Reviewed by Maloti Ray, freelance reviewer

Born in Višegrad, Bosnia and escaping during its Serbian invasion, Saša Stanišić charts his debut novel as a whimsical child tenderly mindful of the river Drina.

Witness to war and peace, the Drina…

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Song For Night: Chris Abani

Reviewed by Michelle Calligaro, Assistant Manager of Readings Carlton

Song for Night is a powerful piece of prose portraying the shocking experiences of an African boy soldier. ‘My Luck’ belongs to a team trained to defuse mines with jungle knives. They have their voca…

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That’d Be Right: William McInnes

Reviewed by Jo Case, editor of Readings Monthly

William McInnes’s writing is a lot like my favourite of his characters: the grizzled journalist, Max Connors, from Sea Change. It’s laconic, unapologetically blokey; a dry wit spiked with lightly wor…

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