Suzanne Steinbruckner

Suzanne Steinbruckner works as a bookseller at Readings St Kilda.

Reviews

Apple and Knife by Intan Paramaditha

Reviewed by Suzanne Steinbruckner

Apple and Knife is an engrossing collection of short stories by Intan Paramaditha, translated into English from Indonesian for the first time by Stephen J. Epstein. I found myself so absorbed in the …

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Prime Suspect 1973

Reviewed by Suzanne Steinbruckner

It’s very satisfying to go back in time and watch the origin story of a character you’ve come to know well from a long-running series. In Prime Suspect 1973, that’s exactly what happens, as newcomer …

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Terra Nullius by Claire G. Coleman

Reviewed by Suzanne Steinbruckner

Claire G. Coleman’s Terra Nullius is a retelling of Australia’s colonial settlement, but not in any way you’ve read it before. Told from both native and settler perspectives, and weaving past and fan…

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Closing Down by Sally Abbott

Reviewed by Suzanne Steinbruckner

I haven’t been able to stop thinking about Sally Abbott’s debut Closing Down since I finished reading it. Abbott has crafted a grim vision of a not-too-distant future world, where climate change and …

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The Case Against Fragrance by Kate Grenville

Reviewed by Suzanne Steinbruckner

The Case Against Fragrance will make you reassess the scents you encounter in your day-to-day life. A departure from her usual fare, the idea for this book came about while Kate Grenville was touring…

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Treading Air by Ariella Van Luyn

Reviewed by Suzanne Steinbruckner

I really fell for Lizzy O’Dea in Ariella Van Luyn’s historical fiction, Treading Air. We meet Lizzie in Brisbane’s lock hospital in 1945. She’s just been given a lighter sentence and learned from the…

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Wildlight by Robyn Mundy

Reviewed by Suzanne Steinbruckner

Robyn Mundy’s novel Wildlight had me wishing to visit Maatsuyker Island (Maat) off the southern coast of Tasmania, despite its cold, wild, wet and windy nature. Sixteen-year-old Stephenie West is abo…

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Mobile Library by David Whitehouse

Reviewed by Suzanne Steinbruckner

Twelve-year-old Bobby Nusku has been having a hard time. He’s a prime target for the school bullies, friends are hard to come by and he and his dad just haven’t been getting along since the accident …

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Springtime: A Ghost Story by Michelle de Kretser

Reviewed by Suzanne Steinbruckner

Michelle de Kretser’s Springtime begins casually after our protagonist, Frances, and her partner, Charlie, move from Melbourne to Sydney. Frances, having taken up a research fellowship at the Univer…

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Confessions of a People-Smuggler by Dawood Amiri

Reviewed by Suzanne Steinbruckner

I felt humbled to read Dawood Amiri’s Confessions of a People-Smuggler. He puts a human face to the people who end up in the messy middle to bottom end of the people-smuggling chain. It was less like…

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Nest by Inga Simpson

Reviewed by Suzanne Steinbruckner

Inga Simpson is one to surprise. Her first novel, Mr Wigg – while not something I would instinctively select – quickly won me over with its heartwarming tale. Her second work of fiction, Nest, again …

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The Free by Willy Vlautin

Reviewed by Suzanne Steinbruckner

At times in Willy Vlautin’s fourth novel, The Free, I found myself wondering if I was reading or had in fact drifted while watching a documentary. The stories in this realist fiction so well match Am…

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Plague and Cholera by Patrick Deville

Reviewed by Suzanne Steinbruckner

I like my novels to drop me straight into events and Patrick Deville’s Plague and Cholera does just that. The reader joins Dr Alexandre Yersin in Paris, May 1940, as he is fleeing France during World…

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A Lifetime on Clouds by Gerald Murnane

Reviewed by Suzanne Steinbruckner

Gerald Murnane had me hooked from page one of what is his second novel, A Lifetime on Clouds. Murnane’s wonderful imagination (and perhaps parallels with his own Catholic schoolboy upbringing) is exh…

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