Ed Moreno

Ed Moreno works as a bookseller at Readings Carlton.

Reviews

Here Comes the Sun by Nicole Dennis-Benn

Reviewed by Ed Moreno

Heads up, reader: rave review (and a surfeit of superlatives) ahead. It’s unavoidable. As a debut novel, Here Comes the Sun is staggeringly spectacular, and marks the beginning of what will surely be…

Read more ›

Men Without Women by Haruki Murakami

Reviewed by Ed Moreno

The seven stories in this collection all feature male protagonists contemplating solitude and loneliness, love and death, and the impossibility of really knowing their unattainable love object. These…

Read more ›

Bright Air Black by David Vann

Reviewed by Ed Moreno

Dark, visceral, lyrical, sinister, sad: David Vann’s hypnotic reimagining of Greek mythology’s famously fiendish Medea is masterful  – the expressive style is bizarre but brilliant. Vann’s poetic pro…

Read more ›

Hag-Seed by Margaret Atwood

Reviewed by Ed Moreno

Margaret Atwood’s Hag-Seed, the fourth novel in the Hogarth Shakespeare series, is a contemporary retelling of Shakespeare’s The Tempest, his late-career tale of magic and illusion. In Atwood’s versi…

Read more ›

The Queen of the Night by Alexander Chee

Reviewed by Ed Moreno

This opulent operatic opus is an over-the-top-of-the-top rags-to-riches postmodern picaresque adventure stuffed full of plot, more plot, plot twists, melodrama, and lots of costume changes. It’s a hi…

Read more ›

Sergio Y. by Alexandre Vidal Porto

Reviewed by Ed Moreno

Published in Brazil as Sergio Y. Vai à America (Sergio Y. Goes to America), Alexandre Vidal Porto’s second novel is a story in which the journey of migration represents another, more critical journey…

Read more ›

LaRose by Louise Erdrich

Reviewed by Ed Moreno

I earmarked Louise Erdrich’s brilliant LaRose as ‘must reread’ about fifty pages in; I’ve since granted it ‘give-this-copy-to-a-friend-and-buy-yourself-another-copy’ status. I want to get it into the…

Read more ›

The Bricks That Built the Houses by Kate Tempest

Reviewed by Ed Moreno

Prepare to be lit up and properly electrified, to feel love, desire, dread and longing in equal parts  – in great swathes or in tiny jolts or in head-ripping explosions. Kate Tempest is hands-down th…

Read more ›

In Other Words by Jhumpa Lahiri

Reviewed by Ed Moreno

Indian-American writer Jhumpa Lahiri was awarded the Pulitzer Prize for Fiction in 2000 for her first book, Interpreter of Maladies, a collection of short stories. She has since published two novels …

Read more ›

The Heart Goes Last by Margaret Atwood

Reviewed by Ed Moreno

Once I started The Heart Goes Last, I couldn’t put it down until I’d read the last word. When I did, I had a perverse smile on my face; Heart sent me gaga, over the moon, triggered euphoria. I was ec…

Read more ›

The Last Word by Hanif Kureishi

Reviewed by Ed Moreno

Hanif Kureishi is probably best known for his early work: his screenplay My Beautiful Laundrette (made into a film by Stephen Frears and starring Daniel Day-Lewis), won a New York Film Critics Circle…

Read more ›

Banshee: Season 1

Reviewed by Ed Moreno

Banshee is pretty much the rollicking-est, sexiest ride you’re bound to take this year. It’s over-the-top and violent, but mostly it’s just wicked fun. So buckle in, hold on and take the ride. It’s s…

Read more ›

The Young Desire It by Kenneth Mackenzie

Reviewed by Ed Moreno

The Young Desire It was awarded the ALS Gold Medal in 1937, when the author was only 24. This extraordinary book, like many first novels, is largely autobiographical – the defining years of protagoni…

Read more ›

Artful by Ali Smith

Reviewed by Ed Moreno

Artful is a pretty special book. Smart and funny, I almost wish I’d written it. But, since Ali Smith beat me to it, I will have to content myself with re-reading it and with sending copies to friends…

Read more ›

There Was A Country by Chinua Achebe

Reviewed by Ed Moreno

Chinua Achebe’s latest book is more than a memoir, more than a history, more than the sum of its parts. There Was a Country is a beautifully woven tapestry, an incantation; it is brave; it is sad and…

Read more ›

News

What I loved: Hour of the Star by Clarice Lispector

by Ed Moreno

My favourite books hook me with their first lines: Margaret Atwood’s Surfacing, for example, or Christopher Isherwood’s Goodbye to Berlin, or Carson McCullers’s The Heart is a Lonely Hunter. The best deliver an uninterrupted flow of intriguing sentences, beginning to end. Clarice Lispector’s Hour of the Star does this in a brutal, disconcerting way, while conveying its story through a scrim of se…

Read more ›

Meet the Bookseller with Ed Moreno

by Ed Moreno

We chat with Ed Moreno about Margaret Atwood’s talent for mythmaking and how Pablo Neruda’s writing prompted him to move to Central America.

Why do you work in books?

As soon as I was able to read, Dad made a chart which involved a specific reward for each book on the chart; I’d receive the reward once I’d read the book and told Dad what I thought of it. The reward usually involved more books…

Read more ›