Australian Fiction reviews

The Best 100 Poems of Dorothy Porter

A wild combination of experimental, popular and prolific, Dorothy Porter was the kind of poet writers want to be and readers – even non-poetry readers – want to read. Black Inc.’s The Best 100 Poems

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Barracuda by Christos Tsiolkas

After the success of 2008’s The Slap, Christos Tsiolkas could be excused for feeling he had nothing more to prove. Perhaps, though, it was that unexpected good fortune that planted one of the seeds f…

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Eyrie by Tim Winton

Tom Keely, the hero of Tim Winton’s latest novel, is a fallen man. We meet him after a night ‘getting off his chops on the fruit of the Barossa’ and an unhealthy dose of prescription meds. The recent…

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Coal Creek by Alex Miller

Alex Miller migrated to Australia when he was only 16 and his first job was as a ringer in outback Queensland. That early experience in the Australian outback informs a number of his works, including…

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The Full Ridiculous by Mark Lamprell

After finishing The Full Ridiculous, it’s hard for me to imagine that the phrase, ‘somehow it feels like the world is against me’, has ever been more apt than for the character of Michael O’Dell. Whi…

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Infamy by Lenny Bartulin

Lenny Bartulin’s exuberant new novel takes place in 1830, in what was then an isolated corner of the British Empire – Van Diemen’s Land. The nascent colony exists in a state of near anarchy, filled a…

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Perfect North by Jenny Bond

During the warm summer of 1897, Sweden sent a hot air balloon to the Arctic with the aim of being the first country to reach the North Pole. By the end of summer, it was clear: the three men had not …

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The Antibiography of Robert F. Menzies by Bernard Cohen

In the early years of the Howard government, the Liberal Party regularly evoked the legacy of its founder and Australia’s longest-serving prime minister, Sir Robert Gordon Menzies. The Menzies era sy…

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The Narrow Road to the Deep North by Richard Flanagan

Richard Flanagan’s savagely beautiful and haunting sixth novel, set in a Japanese POW camp on the Thai-Burma death railway, follows the life of Dorrigo Evans, a surgeon who has left behind two women …

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The Mundiad by Justin Clemens

The first part of Melbourne-based philosopher, academic, art critic and cultural provocateur Justin Clemens’s long poem The Mundiad was published almost ten years ago. It was immediately recognisable…

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