Chris Gordon

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Christine Gordon is the Events Manager for Readings. She blogs about food and gardening at Open Source Outside and puts together the food and gardening column for the Readings Monthly.

Reviews

A God in Ruins by Kate Atkinson

Reviewed by Chris Gordon

Life After Life is one of my favourite books of all time, so it was with some trepidation that I approached A God in Ruins. I was rewarded with feelings of foolishness: after all, with Atkinson you a…

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Goodbye Sweetheart by Marion Halligan

Reviewed by Chris Gordon

This melancholic tale questions notions of security and knowledge in relationships. The protagonist, a successful lawyer, dies suddenly leaving behind his wife, his past wives, his lover, his kids an…

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One Life: My Mother’s Story by Kate Grenville

Reviewed by Chris Gordon

We already know that Grenville is one of Australia’s most-loved story tellers. We already know that each of her stories reflects upon Australia’s history and consciousness. One Life is no exception. …

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Epilogue by Will Boast

Reviewed by Chris Gordon

This  autobiography could have easily, and forgivably, been filled with indulgent analyses of grief, loss and growing up. It opens with Boast’s father dying, quietly and in isolation. Having already …

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The American Lover by Rose Tremain

Reviewed by Chris Gordon

Tremain has won many prestigious writing awards over the years, including the Orange Prize for her novel The Road Home, so we already know we are in the hands of an artist. This wonderful collection …

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Lost & Found by Brooke Davis

Reviewed by Chris Gordon

Expressions like ‘heartwarming’ or ‘finding meaning’ are thrown around fairly liberally in book reviews or publisher blurbs. But what to do when the story really is as heartwarming as this one? If y…

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The Claimant by Janette Turner Hospital

Reviewed by Chris Gordon

In her terrific new novel, with what feels to be great delight, Janet Turner Hospital plays with personal histories and notions of identity to create a work based around the trial of the Vanderbilt f…

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Difficult Pleasures by Anjum Hasan

Reviewed by Chris Gordon

Anjum Hasan’s Difficult Pleasures has been picked up by the excellent Brass Monkeys Books, an Australian-owned publishing house that has built a terrific reputation for bringing Indian-focused titles…

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Kat Jumps the Shark by Melinda Houston

Reviewed by Chris Gordon

I suspect if you lived in Melbourne’s inner-north, one of the chief delights of Melinda Houston’s wry novel would be recognising each place she is writing about. There is a particular joy in having y…

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Tim Winton’s The Turning

Reviewed by Chris Gordon

Settle in ladies and gentlemen, settle in; this could take some time. So much time, in fact, that when this film was screened in local cinemas, an interval was programmed. There is certainly a lot of…

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I’d Eat That!: Simple Ways to be a Better Cook by Callum Hann

Reviewed by Chris Gordon

Callum Hann is that 20-year old sweetheart who came second in the second series of Masterchef and I’d Eat That! is his second cookbook, which he was motivated to write after watching his friends' ap…

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Eating Heaven: Spirituality at the Table by Simon Carey Holt

Reviewed by Chris Gordon

As we move towards our Christmas Day preparations for the ‘Meal to End All Meals’, with expectations heightened by all around you, let’s remember why we do this every single year, even if we are not …

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The Lowland by Jhumpa Lahiri

Reviewed by Chris Gordon

A confession first: shamefully I’ve not read any of Jhumpa Lahiri’s work before, but after reading The Lowland, I’ll be seeking out her Pulitzer Prize winning short-story collection, Interpreter of M

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Letter to George Clooney by Debra Adelaide

Reviewed by Chris Gordon

Debra Adelaide’s new collection of short stories, Letter to George Clooney, is wonderfully dark and humorous, making wicked fun at the familiar typecasts of poets, internet dating, government warning…

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The List of My Desires by Gregoire Delacourt

Reviewed by Chris Gordon

This sweet and sad novel has been one of the top ten bestselling books in France since its publication in February 2012, and really, this makes perfect sense, for here is a confidently told story abo…

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Wildlife by Zucchini-Clan

Reviewed by Chris Gordon

What happens if you put three like-minded musicians with a zany knack of dressing together?

Why, you get the Zucchini-Clan - a wonderful musical troupe with a message to share with both young and ol…

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Women & Power edited by Julianne Schultz

Reviewed by Chris Gordon

Silencing and a disregard for the work women do is hardly a new topic. Women, after all, have been writing about this discrimination seemingly for decades. However, the importance of doing so cannot …

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Toscano’s Family Table by Jo Toscano

Reviewed by Chris Gordon

I would like to let you know that my garden provides enough fruit and vegetables for my family all year round, but sadly that would be a huge lie. I would also like to tell you that I never shop at s…

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Letters To The End Of Love by Yvette Walker

Reviewed by Chris Gordon

Yvette Walker, a fellow bookseller from Western Australia, has written a treat here for those who enjoy gently unfolding narratives, and characters who reveal themselves quietly. There is no sudden c…

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The Wild Girl by Kate Forsyth

Reviewed by Chris Gordon

Kate Forsyth is a storyteller whose books are spun out of magic and folklore. Her most famous work, Bitter Greens, is the retelling of Rapunzel. In all her stories there are princesses and wild fores…

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The Red Book by Deborah Copaken Kogan

Reviewed by Chris Gordon

Deborah Copaken Kogan’s The Red Book centres on a circle of women – all old friends – who come together again at their Harvard college reunion.

Clover, Addison, Mia and Jane were all roommates until…

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Hannah & Emil by Belinda Castles

Reviewed by Chris Gordon

Already I can see the opening movie scene: through the dirt and darkness of war trudges a handsome man, boots worn, collar pulled tightly to keep the wind out, the streets are wet but the twinkle in …

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Unzipped by Nicki Reed

Reviewed by Chris Gordon

Here is a love story for all of us that live on the north side of the river.

Unzipped is Reed’s first novel set around our inner northern suburbs, and what a saucy number it is! The story centres on…

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Workbook No. 15 by Bruno Leti

Reviewed by Chris Gordon

Facts on the table:

I am not an art connoisseur. Bruno Leti is very well-known in the art world and has had work represented in pretty much all national and state art galleries in Australia. Bruno …

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My Hundred Lovers by Susan Johnson

Reviewed by Chris Gordon

Johnson has written extensively about her own life and for that I have always been grateful; her writing makes me feel not alone. In this brilliantly conceived novel, a woman on the eve of her 50th b…

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Text Classics: The Commandant by Jessica Anderson

Reviewed by Chris Gordon, Readings Carlton

It’s peculiar to Australian history - the penal sites around our coast and the heartbreak they caused. Recently I was fortunate enough to visit the Tasmanian site and while reading Jessica Anderson’s…

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Alien Shores by Sharon Rundle & Meenakshi Bharat (eds)

Reviewed by Chris Gordon, Readings Carlton

Alien Shores is a collection of people’s stories about travelling against adversity, heartbreak and racism to start again. There are 19 stories in the collection but each of them seem to hold a simpl…

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Love and Hunger by Charlotte Wood

Reviewed by Chris Gordon, Readings Carlton

Acclaimed novelist Charlotte Wood also writes a popular foodie-type blog about her life in the kitchen and the home, and about the trials and tribulations of cooking for oneself and for one’s family.…

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Sunday’s Garden: Growing Heide by Lesley Harding & Kendrah Morgan

Reviewed by Chris Gordon, Readings Carlton

Just because the nights are longer and the days are colder, please do not take your eyes off your little garden plot and give up. This is when the real pleasure of a bubbling veggie soup on the stove…

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10 Little Insects by Davide Cali

Reviewed by Chris Gordon, Readings Carlton

You already know when dealing with works by the rockstar and illustrator Mr Cali that the work will be beautiful. In 10 Little Insects, the graphics again are colorful and striking with a fair amount…

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News

Q&A with Michelle Crawford

by Chris Gordon

Our resident foodie Chris Gordon chats with Michelle Crawford about her gorgeous memoir / recipe book, A Table in the Orchard: My Delicious Life. Your book is a sweet parcel of family adventures and recipes – I love it! – and the move from Sydney to Tasmania with little kids on tow must have been huge. Were you scared? Do you have any advice for others dreaming of greener fields?

People often…

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Chris Gordon interviews Rachel Khoo

by Chris Gordon

Our resident foodie Chris Gordon chats with British chef, writer and broadcaster Rachel Khoo. First, congratulations on your second cookbook! With your background in art, I imagine you have quite a lot to do with the layout of your books? What’s that process like?

I really enjoy that part of creating a book. It all starts on the photo shoots where I work with a really talented team: David Lof…

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Chris Gordon interviews Alice Zaslavsky

by Chris Gordon

Chris Gordon chats with local foodie Alice Zaslavsky about her new fact-filled, kid-friendly cookbook. Alice, it’s all going on for you! You must be super busy with your new book, your television show, your new business, being the face of Prahran Market – and goodness, do you have time to relax?

Ha! When you put it like that, it does sound like I should have way less time on my hands. I’m pre…

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Chris Gordon reflects on women in science

by Chris Gordon

Earlier this week I chatted with Kate White, an internationally recognised researcher on gender in higher education, about women working in the area of science.

Specifically, we talked about why so many women choose to leave the field of science and why is it important that they stay. White’s research explores new models intended to enable younger women (and men) to have successful science caree…

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Inside the world of online romance scams

by Chris Gordon

Chris Gordon interviews Sofija Stefanovic about her new short book You’re Just Too Good To Be True (part of the Penguin Special series). You’re Just Too Good To Be True is an investigation into the world of online romance scams, specifically those that target lonely seniors.

I thought You’re Just Too Good To Be True was brilliant, and sad actually – a sad indictment on today’s society.

Thanks…

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Why Nick Cave and Harry Potter don’t mix

by Chris Gordon

I want to talk about why a Nick Cave song should never have featured in Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows: Part 1 and why never the twain should have met.

So first things first… How is it that Harry and Hermione are dancing in a barren landscape to ‘O’ Children' by Nick Cave when:

a.) This section is not even in the book
b.) We know Harry doesn’t love Hermione
c.) We know Hermione doesn’t lo…

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