Nicole Mansour

Nicole Mansour is the former Assistant Manager of Readings St Kilda.

Reviews

A Beautiful Truth by Colin McAdam

Reviewed by Nicole Mansour

The blurred line between humans and animals is a familiar one, both in science and in literature. In his latest novel, Colin McAdam has vividly woven these worlds together with humour and tenderness.…

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All the Birds, Singing by Evie Wyld

Reviewed by Nicole Mansour

Australian-born, London-based writer Evie Wyld was recently named as one of Granta’s Best of Young British Novelists for 2013, and her second novel, All the Birds, Singing, is already garnering simil…

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The Flamethrowers by Rachel Kushner

Reviewed by Nicole Mansour

It’s possible that, in another life, I lived in New York, rode a motorcycle and was in love with an Italian artist. This would certainly explain why I find myself captivated by Rachel Kushner’s The F

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In the Memorial Room by Janet Frame

Reviewed by Nicole Mansour

Given that the history of posthumous publishing has not always ended happily, one might be excused from feeling a sense of trepidation as they approach the latest release by New Zealand writer Janet …

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The God Argument by A.C. Grayling

Reviewed by Nicole Mansour

In recent years, the debate between defenders and critics of religion has become acerbic, much like a quarrel between two bad-tempered people. In his latest book, A.C. Grayling sets out to elucidate …

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Clay by Melissa Harrison

Reviewed by Nicole Mansour

Anyone who has ever lived in London will remember with pleasure, I should think, the exquisiteness of the city’s public gardens. From the stretches of commons and parks, to the private squares surrou…

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Ways of Going Home by Alejandro Zambra

Reviewed by Nicole Mansour

I remember, as a child, sitting at our kitchen bench one morning before school and feeling an earthquake. I remember feeling our apartment gently moving, the low rumble, the rattling of the picture f…

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The Hunger Angel by Herta Muller

Reviewed by Nicole Mansour

The rise and fall of Hitler and the Soviet Union has been well documented over the past 60 years or so, and now, Nobel Prize-winner Herta Müller has chosen to add her voice to this long literary trad…

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The Voyage by Murray Bail

Reviewed by Nicole Mansour

Murray Bail is a storyteller. Perhaps not one in the conventional sense, but rather more like a narrator of fables and folktales cleverly fused together, a strange mixture of surrealism and satire. H…

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Triburbia by Karl Taro Greenfeld

Reviewed by Nicole Mansour

Welcome to Triburbia. Well, Tribeca, actually. Karl Taro Greenfeld’s debut novel, set in New York’s trendy lower Manhattan district, is a clever, witty and no doubt thinly veiled chronicle of his own…

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The Dinner by Herman Koch

Reviewed by Nicole Mansour

The Netherlands’ Herman Koch may be considered (by some, at least) a remarkably talented man. A successful screenwriter, producer, playwright and novelist in Europe, his novel, The Dinner, will no do…

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The Invisible Circus by Jennifer Egan

Reviewed by Nicole Mansour

After her Pulitzer Prize-winning success with A Visit from the Goon Squad, Jennifer Egan’s ever expanding fan club has flocked to read her earlier work. Novels Look at Me and The Keep, as well as sho…

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Dublinesque by Enrique Vila-Matas

Reviewed by Nicole Mansour, Readings St Kilda

Spanish born writer Enrique Vila-Matas is the master of the non-novel. Like his other translated work, in particular Bartleby & Co and Never Any End to Paris, his latest novel, Dublinesque, is an ex…

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Near to the Wild Heart by Clarice Lispector

Reviewed by Nicole Mansour, Readings St Kilda

She was the woman who looked like Marlene Dietrich and wrote like Virginia Woolf. Clarice Lispector, born in the Ukraine and raised in Brazil, catapulted to fame in 1943 with the publication of her f…

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