Page 523 of our reviews

Cemetary Lake: Paul Cleave

In New Zealand, Theo Tate, a private investigator, finds himself part of an investigation involving the exhumation of the body of a potential murder victim. As the body is being exhumed, several corp…

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Blue Convenant: Maude Barlow

At the universal scale, swathes of water visually distinguish Earth as the blue planet. At the molecular scale, water is a significant part of living beings; life on Earth originated from and is supp…

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Bowery: Firekites

This CD turned up a few weeks ago in the post. There was no information at all about it. But after a few minutes, I was quickly hooked, as were my colleagues in the office who all enquired as to what…

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Voice Over: Celine Curiol

A nameless young woman announces the train schedule at the Gare du Nord in Paris. The object of her desire lives with another woman, an ‘angel’. She is persuaded to assist a transvestite in his show,…

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Petropolis: Anya Ulinich

This darkly comic debut is both admirably clever and intensely moving. The satire is spot-on and the word pictures just stunning, but the really smart thing about this book is something that seems ve…

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The Outlander: Gil Adamson

As I was reading this book I imagined the Rocky Mountains. I could see in Gil’s descriptions: the dirt, the trees, the frightening sounds and shadows, and I could understand how this novel may well …

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All The Sad Young Literary Men: Keith Gessen

All the Sad Young Literary Men is the first novel by Keith Gessen, one of the founding editors of cutting edge US literary magazine, N+1. As the title suggests, it is primarily concerned with three o…

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The End of the Alphabet: C.S. Richardson

I read this beautiful looking book in one sitting. I didn’t set out to, but I couldn’t put it down. It’s not a long story, but by the time I had finished my heart had broken in that way that makes yo…

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Harry, Revised: Mark Sarvas

Harry Rent is, quite literally, at a loss. A recent widower with a Buddha belly, he spends lonely days at Café Retro, a fifties throwback diner that would put Happy Days to shame. Wifeless and lifele…

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