Steve Bidwell-Brown

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Steve Bidwell-Brown is our Online Fulfilment Manager. He has previously worked as a literary events coordinator for novelists and poets, as a carnie in a travelling circus, and as a semi-professional cricketer in the UK. He likes being able to read and write.

Reviews

True Detective

Reviewed by Steve Bidwell-Brown

As the clinical interrogator of civilisation’s ills, the detective trawls through the darkest and least accessible pockets of society in search of answers to the riddles that lay before them. What em…

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Orfeo by Richard Powers

Reviewed by Steve Bidwell-Brown

In 2004, American art professor Steve Kurtz was arrested when police discovered a laboratory in his house containing artworks made from genetically modified bacteria. Kurtz maintained that his works,…

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Girt: The Unauthorised History of Australia by David Hunt

Reviewed by Steve Bidwell-Brown

Talented comedy writer David Hunt has created a remarkable work of pop history with Girt – a well-researched, engaging and articulate lampooning of Australia’s earliest colonial years.

Taking an ear…

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Forgotten War by Henry Reynolds

Reviewed by Steve Bidwell-Brown

There is a violence in Australia’s history that few are prepared to acknowledge, argues Henry Reynolds, for the country that venerates the Anzac also fails to recognise the Aboriginal Australians who…

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Raised From The Ground by José Saramago

Reviewed by Steve Bidwell-Brown

In Raised from the Ground, the late Nobel Prize-winning novelist José Saramago has taken small plots of Portuguese land and transformed them into densely woven microcosms, creating a fascinating mult…

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The Burning Library by Geordie Williamson

Reviewed by Steve Bidwell-Brown

Why does three-time Miles Franklin Award-winning author David Ireland currently have only one book in print?

Why is M. Bernard Eldershaw’s 1947 capitalism-mocking novel Tomorrow and Tomorrow more re…

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News

What I Loved: The Crying of Lot 49 by Thomas Pynchon

by Steve Bidwell-Brown

It’s the early 1960s and life is aglow on the American east coast. Amateur musicians are composing Beatles-inspired pop music, local shrinks are starting to prescribe medicinal LSD, and words like ‘feminism’ are sprouting in the minds of the young. Somewhere in this budding psychedelic mix is Oedipa Maas, a 28-year-old homemaker who has just been informed that her millionaire ex-lover is dead and…

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